Personalitydata.org

About Us

It started with a challenge: how do psychology students collect more data for their research? We built the site originally as a side project but now our open source data has proved useful for researchers around the world.


The Personality Data Project

How personalitydata.org started and why

Personalitydata.org is the online evolution of The Personality Data Project. A team of graduate psychology students started the open source project in 2018 as an after-labs side-project. Whilst writing their research, they found it difficult to get accurate data on personality traits, and in particular they found it difficult to get enough research participants to take their questionnaire trials (we always need more data!). When they spoke to other students they found this was a common problem, so the the students built a platform where personality data could be collected, analyzed, and published. Since the project was setup in 2018, the network of contributors has grown and the importance of the website has become apparent; the best way to gather large volumes of self-report data on personality is to host the questionnaires on a website with high-traffic; personalitydata.org was born.

face reading open book

The project's aim is simple: help psychology reserachers further what we know about personality.

Now university students, lecturers, and researchers from around the world all contribute to ensure personalitydata.org is up-to-date and accurate. Psychology students from hundreds of different universities have now used the website to host their personality questionnaires and where the results are relevant, publish the findings online in a clear format.

Please feel free to email us on info@personalitydata.org

If you are in the field of psychology or personality research, we welcome your help with the project. We usually need data scientists, content-writers, subject matter experts, and volunteers. If you have something to offer please do contact us.

Founding members

The Personality Data Project was was setup by graduate Psychology students. The project now has contributing authors and research partners from around the world, but the original team consists of:

Founding Members

person icon

Jonathan Wang

M.S. in Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Madison

person icon

Brett Sanderson

M.S. in Psychology, University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign

person icon

Stella Zhang

M.S. in Psychology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

People who have helped with data collection and analysis

The hard work of collecting hundreds of thousands of data points from participants and running analyses (SPSS, Winsteps, Excel) is widely appreciated. Special mentions go to:

person icon

Chuanye Miao, PhD

Graduate Student; Personality and Social Contexts, University of Michigan Ann Arbor

person icon

Beatrice Ma

Graduate Student; Cognition and Cognitive Neuroscience, University of Michigan Ann Arbor

person icon

Ayodele Ojo

M.S., Psychological Sciences, University of Illinois Urbana Champaign

person icon

Viktoria Nautnes

B.S., Psychology; Minor in Philosophy, Purdue University

person icon

Anita Sudera

B.S., Psychology, University of Washington, Cognitive Neuroscience

person icon

Georgia Petsiou

Graduate Student; Cognition and Cognitive Neuroscience, University of Michigan Ann Arbor

person icon

Caroline Burnham

Research Fellow, University of Michigan Ann Arbor

People who have helped develop our proprietary personality assessments

One of the many positive outcomes of the project is the development of new personality assessments. We have developed several tools, the most significant being our Enneagram test and Jungian Subtype Type Indicator (JSTI) (personality test). Principal researchers are:

person icon

Ellie Simmonds, MSc

University of Bath, Psychology

person icon

Ronit Vishwanathan, MSc

Birkbeck, University of London, Occupational Psychology

person icon

Chloe Yarwood, MSc

University of Chichester, Advanced Applied Psychology

People who have helped with software and the website

How do we best run R packages and interpret the data? How do we succinctly publish our data online? How do we make a website that attracts more people to take the questionnaires? Our tech heros are:

person icon

Johnny Tran, BSc

University of Glasgow, Mathematics

person icon

Jordan Sadler

Freelance web designer, London UK

person icon

Martynas Venckus, MEng

University of Glasgow, Mechanical Engineering


Open source collaboration project

Thank you to everyone who has contributed to this the open source Personality Data Project. Through your help we shall continue to make this website a useful resource for accurate personality data and personality data collection.


London, UK

Our main office is: 1 Waterhouse Square London EC1N 2ST, UK

london location